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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 420 (some duplicates have been removed)
president of the united states. >> fdr is someone who totally changed the face of this country, totally changed the direction of this country. >> roosevelt was elected and re-elected an incredible four times. the fdr memorial has four rooms, one for each of his terms in office. when he became president in 1933, our country was suffering the worst financial crisis in our history -- the great depression. statues of soup lines and dust bowl farmers illustrate those hard times. but why the man listening to a radio? >> there was no television then. how did you communicate? the president communicated via radio. >> fdr's way with words gave people hope in those dark days of the depression. carved on the memorial's walls are some of his most famous quotes. for example, "the only thing we have to fear is fear itself." >> if you give time and you really soak in and pay attention to what is being said in those statements, they're very powerful statements. >> something else that makes a very powerful statement is the memorial's use of water. what does the water symbolize? >> water symbolizes freedo
. only fdr with match that. joining me now, doug brinkley and doris kearns goodwin. welcome to you both. >> thank you. >> thank you, glad to be here. >> doris, i'm excited to finally talk to you. because i've talked to doug a few times. i went to see "lincoln" the other day. i thought it was absolutely a magnificent movie and really just showed me firsthand what an extraordinary man lincoln was. >> there's no question. i mean, i'm so proud of what they did. you almost feel like you're watching abraham lincoln walking and talking and the political genius that he had. in our time now to see the possibility of getting those characters in congress to come together to do something is a great sobering lesson. >> do you wish perhaps that today's politicians from the president down showed some of the moral courage that lincoln showed over the issue of slavery, for example? >> i think that's the real point. you know, everybody talks about we wish the politicians today showed the compromise which the movie shows and lincoln showed. but it's the moral courage and the convictions of fighting for th
obama, even if he confronts a hostile opposition, still pursue a historic legacy, like f.d.r. in world war ii? could he hold a fighting action on one front to push for spending cuts while battling for gun safety and immigration reform on a second front? finally, picture-perfect. there are beautiful american families, a and no one treasures them more than the man in the white house. in the same week the president spoke parmelee about the time he spends with his daughters, reaction to that hateful n.r.a. ad may have shown how warmly the country has adopted them. chris: i'm chris matthews welcome to the show. with us joe klein from "time" magazine, the bbc's katty kay, nia-malika henderson henderson and david leonhardt. the president addresses the country and he will try to project his will that would block his legacy. opposition to barack obama in some quarters is searing. hear how sean hannity greeted the obama victory in november -- >> america wanted barack obama for four more years, and now we have him. by the way, good luck with that. chris: that was a bit sarcastic. today as the pre
washington, abraham lincoln, fdr had a huge crises to face. obama had a pretty serious crisis to face. he did accomplish in health care something since presidents since teddy roosevelt have been trying to accomplish. but i think most importantly, we'll see now the fact that he's got a second term, that's really important to embolden him for what he can accomplish, and more importantly, to show that the country supported during a very difficult time his leadership and they wanted him back again. so i think he's got a shot. it depends a lot on what happens in the second term, if he can create -- i wish he would go in the midterms to try to take the house back. i think in some ways that might be the only way to break this dysfunction. but even if he doesn't get the house back, if he's able to somehow build on the electoral majority that he had this time around, ronald reagan last in history because he built an electoral majority that lasted after him. fdr, too. that's the direction, i think, by mobilizing his base that he might be able to go. >> i watched the lincoln movie, you saw a very differ
without an overcoat. f.d.r.'s inauguration was the first held in january after a constitutional amendment moved the date up from march. finally more people witnessed brom's first than any other event ever held in washington. >> wow, i love that stuff. chris: thanks to our producer for that great, great great product there. anyway, you had something to add. >> my colleague, aleash yarks pointed out that obama will be the first president since f.d.r. to take the oath of office four times. he flubbed the first one and had to redo it. this time because it falls on a sunday he'll do it privately on sunday and then redo it on monday. chris: when we come back, only one other guy. in the first term the obama family was close to perfect. no mistakes. >> they don't want to sneand much time with me anyway. chris: that was the president. spending so many evens with his kids rather than spending quality time with members of congress. well, the country seems to have adopted this young first family and the appears is that despite the pressures, the family's come through it well. take a look at how worri
of the imperial presidency. other transformational democratic presidents such as fdr and lbj, rockman says, have substantial democratic majorities in both the senate and in the house to enact their landmark legislation. obama in contrast has had to work with a narrow democratic majority in the senate and with an opposition party, the republicans in control of the house for the two years since january 2011. well, what about ronald reagan? president of the united states two successful four-year terms. on the domestic front, he enacted a major economic recovery package followed by an overhaul of social security. and in his second term, reagan gained a major tax reform. on the defense front, republican president reagan again with the help of the rity presided over a major increase in the defense budget, congress presided over a major increase in the defense budget, the defe including straby millions of protesters here and abroad. also commander in chief reagan gained secret aid for freedom fighters in central america, the quote unquote contras. in his second term reagan negotiated a nuclear arms con
republican family. i don't think my parents ever voted for a democrat. >> rose: even f.d.r.? >> even f.d.r. i'll tell you what they taught me. my father listened to all of those fire side chats of f.d.r.'s. he greatly respected roosevelt. and what his parishioners would complain about roosevelt my father would always say "now look, brother smith, the man is doing the best he knows how. let's not knock him too hard." i always thought maybe once he might have sneak add vote in there for f.d.r. >> rose: (laughs) in '32 or '36. maybe '40. >> whoever was in the white house, whether a democrat or republican, my father would always say "the man is doing the best he knows how. don't knock him too hard." but i think what led me to become a progressive or a liberal or whatever you want to call me is that i saw what the depression did to the people in my state. hardworking farmers that went broke. bankers that went bankrupt. stores that closed. it was a sad time and then i saw franklin roosevelt's strong new deal video make a difference. the c.c.c. camp for young men. they worked progress administration
inaugurable addresses. fdr acknowledges that for all the progress made, remember the famous line -- clothed, ill fed. he was acknowledging unfinished business. host: as the author of the book "patriarch," he delivered the first second inaugural address. is it inaugurable? -- memorable? guest: he had a thin skin. he was not accustomed to the kinds of press attacks he was experiencing. second term in the first place. he was talked into it. he was actually resentful. it is the shortest inaugural address on record. it is fewer than200 words. was in the capital. basically called god to witness. if he failed to live up to the were be punishment for that. certainly posterity would. it was a strange speech. very personal, very revealing. host: richard norton smith has written a number of books. including "thomas e. dewey and his times." he is now working on a new book rockefeller. guest: they had a number of house. he had a place of his own in northwest washington. host: also affiliated with george mason university. we will take a look of what the president can expect in his second term. we have no
on vacation. fdr was actually on a cruise. i guess we can't really blame him, it was probably a pretty well-deserved vacation. but three years earlier fdr had refused to include medical coverage as part of the social security act because he did not want to an tagtize the american medical profession. he did send a message of support to the health conference, but not long afterward the outbreak of world war ii forced the president's attention elsewhere. five years later on january 11, 944, in his state of the union address roosevelt spoke to the american people about the war and especially about the kind of peace the allies planned to establish after the defeat of fascism. he said that the one supreme objective for the future can be summed up in one word: security. and that means not only physical security which provides safety from attacks by aggressors, it means also economic security and social security. the individual political rights upon which the united states had been built, roosevelt argued, were necessary but not sufficient to guarantee true freedom and security. fdr then announced
of texas. he can rise above everyday politics and speak to history. lincoln did in the 1865, f.d.r. in 1937, now it's obama's chance." did he do that? >> yeah, i think he did it pretty well. this wasn't lincoln 1865 but we haven't had one since. the closest was roosevelt 1937. we're not likely to see that, charlie. i thought he did whatrand said he should do. i appreciate what mark is saying but i think this is not a programmatic speech. this is not a speech where you talk about here's my four-point jobs program. it's a speech about vision and i thought he gave a good sense of where he wanted the country to be i think it clearly was a progressive democratic speech. in f you read reagan's in 1985 it was a conservative republican speech. and a as for those who say -- i watched fox news who say he didn't offer olive branches or reach across the table to try to encourage birtisanship, i would note 16 years ago bill clinton in his second inaugural said that you have sent a democratic president and a republican congress back to washington, you didn't send us back to engage in bickering and partis
, apparently. what if we found out about fdr's this behavior. what if we threw fdr out of office and demanded his resignation as the economy was recovering? all the way back to the french and indian war of very young george washington was riding very romantic letters to a woman who was not mrs. washington. her name was salutary bear facts to my very attractive, older, sophisticated never. what if washington's letters have become public during the french and indian war or the revolutionary war? much as the traces e-mails became public. what if we get rid of george washington? so girlfriend is not the worst. patraeus is not the first and not the worst. been there, done that. there's a long history of it. in fact and it pains me to say that even abraham lincoln visited a prostitute. i know. citizens so. it happened. the details on the sketchy. there is a lot of -- there aren't a lot of letters written about this, but here's what we can piece together. lincoln's best friend was joshua stevens. and he was, perhaps, as dashing in this handsome and best of my guess, "and "lucky with the link -- ladi
, vaguely charming way he had, a lot like fdr, everyone thought he agreed with him. there's a fly buzzing around and jefferson is nodding and nodding and losing i contact with davis and grab the fly and begins pulling apart. davis begins to realize this may not work quite as well as he hoped. second story. today you have the man who can snap a fly and pull it apart, ferociously focused on his debates, often making you think he is not focused. he traveled a couple days from monticello to washington, stop-and in, falls into a conversation with a fellow guest and wide ranging discussion the following morning, mr. jefferson is up and out. the other guests never caught his name and he said to the innkeeper who was that and the innkeeper said who do you think it was? after a while i thought he knew so much about medicine, i thought he was a doctor. then we talked about theology, seemed he might be a priest, still a shaky one. i thought he could have been a farmer because of everything he knew. the innkeeper said i thought you knew mr. jefferson. he was a master of so many different worlds. he w
't really answer. reagan, obama, less than 30 years, what's happened in america? >> i think, you know, f.d.r. once said that great presidents become great because they come to power at a moment when ideas in the life of the nation require clarification. and they offer that clarification. ronald reagan's rise was an answer to the excesses of the new deal and the great society. he has a man who brought the conversation from the first point being what can the state do to being what the market can do? i think what's happened in the last 30 years and what's happening right now is that we know in our hearts that the choices we face that you just alluded to, the gao report, the expensive healthcare. the expense of the entitlements, the idea that so much of our future is mortgaged and only growing higher is a tough choice. and we're not apparently ready as a people and certainly not as an administration, and the obama administration to make those hard choices. i think we are threading water in the united states. and i think president obama is in some ways a figure of a threading water are a. >> bill
george washington said at his inaugural and fdr and lincoln. >> to me the founding fathers are the dream and the civil war and abraham lincoln are where the rubber hits the road, that's where this country sort of manifests. and that's where its division manifested and we still suffer from those divisions of the civil war. we're still fighting the civil war i think and there are people who, you know, to their discredit, there are people who mine and encourage us to refight the civil war. they find political strength from doing that. i'm talking to karl rove here and reopening the wounds of the civil war. >> rose: for political advantage. >> for political base and to hide their real political agenda which is elitist and you can't sell to a whole bunch of people because it didn't benefit anyway. >> rose: what i say about music, it's just ideas. it's the people that receive them, you know. >> right. >> rose: people that receive. >> that's very well put. music is not something that you, i mean although critics do it all the time, music either hits or misses. a song comes in and it's either
comparison between the hillary clinton marriage and fdr and el nor? >> no. yes. i'm sorry do i see any comparison between the hilary bill marriage and the fdr eleanor marriage? >> the reason i say no is that yes, franklin and el nor were political colleagues. starting in 1922 which fdr had polio she was the political surrogate. she represented him on numerous occasions. she headed the democratic national committee, she was very instrumental in many of the reforms that was the deal. but frank lynn had an affair with hillary's private assistant world war i when she found out about that, she wanted a divorce. that was the end of their marital relationship. their political relationship remained intacted but never became intimate people again. the reason why it's different is they had carved out distinctive roles. they were important roles el nor was an extraordinary first lady but it was not something which was a product of their personal chemistry. and the ongoing intimate relationship. yeah? >> if hillary is a bridge builder, yes. >> what happened with the health care and what would she
other than f.d.r. who has been sworn in four times. >> that's right. and f.d.r. had to win four elections to do it. >> this is a much simpler way to do it i want to go back to merley evers, and i wonder if you were strublg as i was with the history of that. >> she was calling for a feeling of unity and bringing america together. you get the sense, we hope that the president's speech continues that theme. [cannons firing] ♪ ♪ [cannons firing] >> a 21-georgia salute. nothing >> ladies and gentlemen, it is my privilege and distinct honor to introduce the 44th president of the united states of america, barack h. obama. [cheering] [cheers and applause] >> thank you [crowd chanting "obama, obama"] >> thank you. thank you so much. vice president biden, mr. chief justice, members of the united states congress, distinguished guests, and fellow citizens, each time we gather to inaugurate a president, we bear witness to the enduring strength of our constitution. we affirm the promise of our democracy. we were called to what binds this nation together as not the colors of our skin or th
before, for fdr. why did fdr give in? he had been so powerful? he had bucked the system before. he was a little bit more like obama today, but circumstances changed him. >> what changed him was the uprising on the left. in 1934, the massive strike movement, the rise of upton sinclair, there was a massive upsurge of the left in the mid- 1930's. the republican right was almost voted out of congress in 1936. there was a very sharp move to the left, and that made it possible for roosevelt to propose more progressive policies. the same thing is missing under obama. that is why we held out some hope for obama, if we could have an upsurge politically in the united states. it seems to have died down. when obama took office, he demobilize the movement that supported him in 2008. >> it is only theory, but roosevelt was exhausted. he did not even go to the conventions in san diego when he said, if i was voting personally, i would vote for wallace. he backed him, but he did not fight the bosses. eleanor roosevelt was heartbroken about this. you'rehard to believe vi going to die. he thought he
president and you're saying wallace--there is so much interest to dig into. do you think fdr really wanted wallace and was unable to happen? >> fdr, he was near death. he was very weak. the bosses came to him and said we want to get rid of wallace on the ticket. >> eliot: more importantly if it had been president wallace not president truman, we would have gone in a fundamentally different direction. >> he would have tried. >> eliot: people don't remember henry wallace. he's one of those vice presidents who are forgot no one the dust bin of history. >> the very first thing that comes up on the agenda is the atomic bomb. wallace knew a lot about it. he was the liaison with the scientists. he never would have dropped that bomb. there was no need to. japan was defeated. >> eliot: what is your theory about why the decision was made to use the bomb. >> to intimidate the soviet union and give a clear barbaric message to stalin that we are the new order of business. you will not screw with the united states, and we're willing to kill people at any level. >> eliot: to defend the history books on t
as they walked into history. two years later, women would begin to vote. fdr's second inaugural, the wettest on record. but listen to this. >> fdr decided if the crowd could brave the elements so could he. >> reporter: he insisted on riding in an open car. >> i harry s. truman do solemnly swear. >> you will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states. >> reporter: a tv first for harry truman, january 1949. americans could finally watch the inauguration on television. these were the preps more than 50 years ago for dwight eisenhower, giant platforms for a mere 12,000 invited guests. there were four inaugural balls awaiting them. lyndon johnson made history, after one of the darkest days in america, the first president to ride to his inaugural in a bulletproof limo after the assassination of jfk. ronald reagan, second inaugural, so cold, only snow filled the stands. the public swearing-in ceremony, moved indoors. bill clinton ushering more than just a second term. the first to be carried on that thing called the internet. and on monday, president obama with the first lady b
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 420 (some duplicates have been removed)